More women are surviving cancer – but suffering financially!

different types of cancerInsurance claims statistics from Altrisk show that breast cancer and heart disease are the leading causes of critical illness and death claims among its female clients, and yet on both these fronts, women remain significantly underinsured when it comes to securing their financial security during a health crisis.

Ask yourself this question: Will you and your family be in a position to provide financially for additional expenses and the cost of lifestyle changes that may come with a disability or serious illness, or worse, the loss of an income provider?   Women shouldn’t be lulled into a false belief that serious illnesses such as cancer and heart disease only affect men and the elderly. Altrisk statistics show that women remain significantly underinsured, and yet submit more critical illness claims than men.

 

Claims causes

  • Of the total claims by women, 23% are for critical illness, 30% are life claims and 22% are disability claims, often as a result of suffering a disabling critical illness.
  • Of all Altrisk’s 2013 claims by women, breast cancer accounts for 23% and cardiac conditions account for 25%.  Both these illnesses share equal prominence in female healthcare circles, and heart disease is no longer the ambit of middle-aged men.
  • The age band of women with the highest number of critical illness claims submitted is 31-50 years of age, the prime of your life and working career.  The age band with the highest number of disability claims is 41-50 years of age.
  • Of all the cancer claims by women, breast cancer dominates as the leading claims cause, where the highest number of claims is in the age band 41-50, followed by 51 to 60.
  • Heart disease and strokes are increasingly vying for the leading cause of death and critical illness claims by women, with the largest percentage of women falling between the ages of 41 and 50. This closely maps heart disease statistics in men where the age group 41-50 also registers the highest percentage of claims for heart disease.
  • In terms of female sums assured, the average sum assured on life is R780 000, and on critical illness it is much lower at R320 000.  When one consider the real costs of medical treatment, rehabilitation, lost income and any necessary lifestyle changes, it soon becomes very apparent that women are still woefully under-insured when it comes to dealing with a serious health or life threatening crisis.

The majority of the critical illness, life and disability claims are made by women between the ages of 41 and 55. This is considered the prime of your life and when you are most reliant on your income for financial security and likely to have significant financial liabilities.

 

More women are surviving cancer – but suffering financially

Cancer claims, particularly for breast cancer, are happening at increasingly younger ages.  This could mean that women are heeding the call for early detection and diagnosis.  Altrisk has noted a distinct shift over the past five years, with an increase in early cancer claims, particularly for breast cancer.   There are more claims for stage 1 and 2 cancers, and a decline in claims for more advanced stage 3 and 4 cancers.

“The emphasis on pre-emptive screening and early diagnosis and treatment cannot be emphasised enough in the fight against breast cancer. Early detection and treatment of breast cancer are important factors in winning the battle and surviving with less extensive, invasive surgery – and with your finances intact,” says André Froneman, product specialist at Altrisk.

This is why it’s essential that you have the right insurance cover in place to protect your financial security, should you contract a critical illness. And women also shouldn’t neglect this type of insurance while they are young, either. “The reality is that you need to have cover in place when you are younger. This is the most productive time of your life, when you are most reliant on your income to meet financial obligations, take care of your family and secure a comfortable future,” he says.

What many women don’t take into account is that even with an early stage cancer diagnosis, treatment and recovery can be a long and even debilitating process. During this time you might not be able to work, and perhaps even suffer side effects of treatment.   “Besides having to cope with the emotional and psychological trauma of cancer, the side effects of treatment can have a dramatic impact on your normal day-to-day activities and your ability to work and earn an income,” explains André.

Today women are equal contributors to household income, if not breadwinners, and play a crucial role as the primary care giver in many households.  Yet a large proportion of women remain underinsured when it comes to managing a worst case scenario such as a cancer diagnosis.

“Make sure that you understand the financial consequences of what could happen if you were to contract a serious illness, and have a plan in place should this occur, because for most people insurance is the only way to manage the risk cost effectively,” he says.  “The emphasis on breast health, especially during October as Breast Health Awareness month is not without good reason.”

While it’s worrying that women are now more likely to develop breast cancer than they were a decade ago, there is also good news. Early detection and diagnosis means that survival rates have gone up dramatically too. Almost 2 out of every 3 women with breast cancer now survive the disease beyond 20 years, compared to less than half in the 1990s. Research and early detection are at the heart of this progress.

“No one knows what the future holds and whether you could face a health crisis in future, so make sure that should the unthinkable happen, you have a financial plan in place that makes it possible for you to focus on your recovery, rather than on how to deal with the consequences of a loss of income during your illness.  The real challenge in surviving a disability or illness is being able to provide a future income for yourself and your family, and this is where a financial advisor can help you to develop a financial plan,” concludes André.

Read more at www.altrisk.co.za

* Statistics based on Altrisk’s assessment of its critical illness, disability and life insurance claims, made by women for 2013.

Dramatic stage sees lead change at Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek international mountain bike race

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Tim Bohme and Simon Stiebjahn claim the stage win and the overall lead on Stage 4 of the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

Stage 4 of the 2014 Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek international stage race was always expected to deliver a shake-up; and it didn’t disappoint. As if the 109km with 2690m of ascent from De Rust to George wasn’t difficult enough, the riders had to conquer some exceptionally rough terrain and contend with rain and cold too.

In the men’s race, the Team Bulls pairing of Simon Stiebjahn and Tim Bohme charged to the stage win and in the process reclaimed the overall lead from South Africans Philip Buys and Matthys Beukes (SCOTT Factory Racing). And in the women’s race Asrin Cycling’s Catherine Williamson (GBR) and Alice Pirard (BEL) also grabbed the stage win and race lead.

Unfazed by the weather, the German Team Bulls duo were the aggressors on the demanding stage, taking the lead on a climb at 68km into the race, intent on reclaiming some of the three minute deficit from Stage 2 when they relinquished the race lead to Beukes and Buys.

Beukes managed to stay with the Bulls riders over the top of the climb, but Buys was a little further back, expecting to rejoin on the descent when Beukes sustained a cut to his rear tyre.

“We bombed it but it lost air towards the last tech zone at 90km, so when we got there we changed the whole wheel,” explained Buys. “It’s a risk we took choosing hardtail frames for this race. A dual-suspension frame would have been more forgiving on this section. We’re not out of it yet. Still two more stages to race.”

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Herman Persteiner, stage runner up with James Reid, shows the effects of the rainy conditions on Stage 4 of the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

Bohme and Stiebjahn clocked a time of 4 hours 59 minutes and 24 seconds. Second place on Thursday went to the Asrin cycling duo of James Reid (RSA) and Herman Persteiner (AUT), just less than two minutes back with Buys and Beukes rounding out the podium in 5:06:24, putting them 3:35 off The Bulls’ overall lead.

“These conditions aren’t unusual for us Europeans. So we made the most of that and went on the attack today,” said Stiebjahn. “We definitely put the SCOTT guys under pressure before they had their flat. Tim was super strong in the last 20km though – he pulled me through as I was suffering.”

While it was day of misfortune for Buys and Beukes, it was a day of improved fortune for Reid and Persteiner, who suffered a mechanical on Wednesday and were given a time penalty on Tuesday for being more than two minutes apart at the stage finish. They moved from ninth up to fifth the General Classification with two stages remaining.

“We’re so eager to get a stage win and came close today. But I guess the Bulls were more motivated with the GC lead as their target. We’ll keep trying,” quipped Reid.

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Alice Pirard and Catherine Williamson celebrate winning the stage and claiming the overall lead on Stage 4 of the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

In the women’s race, Williamson and Pirard had passed De Groot and Stenerhag on one of the early climbs and were unaware of the mechanical trouble suffered by the race leaders, forging ahead steadily and eventually finishing 19th overall in a time of 6:04:02.

“I’ve been riding one speed this whole race so we were behind Robyn and Jennie early on but caught their group after a while. Then on one of the steep climbs we moved ahead of them. We seem to be better on the steep climbs than they are,” recalled Williamson.

“I don’t know what trouble they had but I know that we rode cautiously but steadily today because we didn’t want to risk crashing or puncturing. Alice is a really good descender, so I followed her lines on the downhills and we actually finished really strong. It’s great to be leading the race, but we can’t be satisfied until the end of the final stage and will do our best to defend the Pink Jersey,” she added.

De Groot suffered a sidewall cut in her rear tyre, but she and Stenerhag had an additional problem with the rear wheel axle.

“The quick release through-axle broke while we were trying to remove the wheel. So we had to repair that first. Then the tyre cut was too big to plug, so we had to insert a gaitor and a tube. When it’s muddy all of this is even more tricky to do,” said a dejected De Groot.

Second place on the stage went to Cherise Stander (RSA) and Candice Neethling (#iride4Burry) with Meerendal Wheeler’s Theresa Ralph (RSA) and Esther Suss (SUI) claiming third place. De Groot and Stenerhag were fourth, but lost 37 minutes and the overall lead to Williamson and Pirard, who now have a healthy 24:21 lead.

In the other team racing categories, South Africans Brian Lennox and Hannes Hanekom (Klein Karoo Giants) were the top Amateurs, extending their GC lead in the process. South Africans Kobus and Fienie Barnard (Klein Karoo Mixed), won the stage again, reducing their deficit by a further three-minutes to Germans Max Friedrich and Jana Mischance (Firebike Tomotion by Blacktusk), who were second on the stage, but retain the Mixed overall lead.

Heinz Zorweg (AUT) and Bartie Bucher (SUI) of Team Meerendal Wheeler 2 claimed a fifth consecutive stage win and now hold a massive Masters category lead; while South Africans Johan Labuschagne and Gerrie Beukes (Klein Karoo Veterans) secured a third successive stage win and moved into the Veteran category lead.

In the Solo men’s division, Travis Walker (RSA – Kargo Pro Racing) won the stage in his category and extended his General Classification lead, while Christine Janse van Rensburg (RSA), extended her Solo women’s category lead with another stage win.

Friday’s Stage 5 from George to Herold is somewhat deceptive. In just 71km, riders will have to climb 1755 metres, initially up an 18km climb out of George to the Montagu Pass, after which riders will be taken on a new section of trails through the Klein Langkloof along the northern slopes of the Outeniqua Mountains.

For more information on the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek, visit www.capepioneer.co.za. For race updates, follow @BridgeCPT on twitter and Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek on Facebook.

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Rain made progress through the Kammanassie Reserve even more challenging on Stage 4 of the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek 2014
Stage 4
Leading results
Men:
1 Simon Stiebjahn (GER) / Tim Bohme (GER) – Team Bulls 4:59:29
2 James Reid (RSA) / Herman Persteiner (AUT) – Asrin Cycling 5:01:18
3 Philip Buys (RSA) / Matthys Beukes (RSA) – SCOTT Factory Racing 5:06:31
4 Johann Rabie (RSA) / Gawie Combrinck (RSA) – EAI South Africa 5:15:44
5 Adriaan Louw (RSA) / Lourens Luus (RSA) – Fairview Elite 5:17:42

Women:
1 Catherine Williamson (GBR) / Alice Pirard (BEL) Asrin Cycling 2 6:04:02
2 Cherise Stander (RSA) / Candice Neethling (RSA) #iride4Burry 6:25:03
3 Theresa Ralph (RSA) / Esther Suss (SUI) – Meerendal Wheeler 1 6:28:38

Amateur:
1 Brian Lennox (RSA) / Hannes Hanekom (RSA) – Klein Karoo Giants 6:06:11
2 Phillimon Sebona (RSA) / Jan Motsoa (RSA) – Klein Karoo International 6:10:29
3 Mattias Winkler (SUI) / Francois Naf (SUI) Meerendal Wheeler 6:11:57

Veteran men:
1 Johan Labuschagne (RSA) / Gerrie Beukes (RSA) Klein Karoo Veterans 6:04:26
2 Malcolm Dods (RSA) / Billy Stelling (RSA) Swift Carbon 6:22:09
3 Fanie Venter (RSA) / Wayne McDuling (RSA) – Pynfabriek 6:22:45

Master men:
1 Heinz Zorweg (AUT) / Barti Bucher (SUI) – Meerendal Wheeler 2 5:50:31
2 Izak Visagie (RSA) / Lieb Loots (RSA) – Wilde 3 6:27:54
3 Waleed Baker (RSA) / Glen Haw (RSA) – Pitstop 6:44:33

Mixed:
1 Kobus Barnard (RSA) / Fienie Barnard (RSA) – Klein Karoo Mixed 6:07:26
2 Max Friedrich (GER) / Jana Zieschank (GER) – Firebike Tomotion by Blacktusk 6:10:25
3 Igna de Villiers (RSA) / Daleen Van der Leek (RSA) LGE Midas Bells Cycling 6:44:50

Solo men:
1 Travis Walker (RSA – Kargo Pro Racing) 5:06:33
2 Renay Groustra (RSA – RSAweb) 5:23:38
3 Alan Gordon (RSA) 5:37:01

Solo women:
1 Christine Janse van Rensburg (RSA) 7:15:11
2 Katja Cauwenbergh (BEL) 7:40:24
3 Gina Nixon (RSA) 8:00:14

Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek 2014
General Classification after Stage 4
Leading results
Men:
1 Simon Stiebjahn (GER) / Tim Bohme (GER) – Team Bulls 17:15:52
2 Philip Buys (RSA) / Matthys Beukes (RSA) – SCOTT Factory Racing 17:19:27
3 Johann Rabie (RSA) / Gawie Combrinck (RSA) – EAI South Africa 17:50:33
4 Michiel van Aelbroeck (NED) / Robby de Bock (NED) WMTB.Be – Feenstra 17:54:31
5 James Reid (RSA) / Herman Persteiner (AUT) – Asrin Cycling 17:55:49

Women:
1 Catherine Williamson (GBR) / Alice Pirard (BEL) – Asrin Cycling 20:20:38
2 Jennie Stenerhag (SWE) / Robyn de Groot (RSA) – Biogen Toyota Cape Brewing Co 20:45:17
3 Theresa Ralph (RSA) / Esther Suss (SUI) – Meerendal Wheeler 1 21:12:12

Amateur:
1 Brian Lennox (RSA) / Hannes Hannekom (RSA) – Klein Karoo Giants 19:49:55
2 Mattias Winkler (SUI) / Francois Naf (SUI) Meerendal Wheeler 20:10:36
3 Phillimon Sebona (RSA) / Jan Motsoa (RSA) – Klein Karoo International 20:22:05

Veteran men:
1 Johan Labuschagne (RSA) / Gerrie Beukes (RSA) Klein Karoo Veterans 20:11:02
2 Fanie Venter (RSA) / Wayne McDuling (RSA) – Pynfabriek 20:28:36
3 Malcolm Dods (RSA) / Billy Stelling (RSA) Swift Carbon 21:30:02

Master men:
1 Heinz Zorweg (AUT) / Barti Bucher (SUI) – Meerendal Wheeler 2 19:02:24
2 Izak Visagie (RSA) / Lieb Loots (RSA) – Wilde 3 21:19:28
3 Waleed Baker (RSA) / Glen Haw (RSA) – Pitstop 22:06:21

Mixed:
1 Max Friedrich (GER) / Jana Zieschank (GER) – Firebike Tomotion by Blacktusk 20:20:24
2 Kobus Barnard (RSA) / Fienie Barnard (RSA) – Klein Karoo Mixed 20:28:17
3 Igna de Villiers (RSA) / Daleen Van der Leek (RSA) LGE Midas Bells Cycling 21:35:36

Solo men:
1 Travis Walker (RSA – Kargo Pro Racing) 17:49:35
2 Alan Gordon (RSA) 18:22:11
3 Ken van den Bulke (BEL) 18:25:32

Solo women:
1 Christine Janse van Rensburg (RSA) 22:29:23
2 Katja Cauwenbergh (BEL) 24:22:38
3 Gina Nixon (RSA) 26:11:14

Elite points
Men
1 Philip Buys (RSA) / Matthys Beukes (RSA) – SCOTT Factory Racing 41
2 Simon Stiebjahn (GER) / Tim Bohme (GER) – Team Bulls 40
3 James Reid (RSA) / Herman Persteiner (AUT) – Asrin Cycling 25

Women
1 Jennie Stenerhag (SWE) / Robyn de Groot (RSA) – Biogen Toyota Cape Brewing Co 42
2 Catherine Williamson (GBR) / Alice Pirard (BEL) – Asrin Cycling 39
3 Theresa Ralph (RSA) / Esther Suss (SUI) – Meerendal Wheeler 1 35

For full results visit www.capepioneer.co.za

Also view:

Mountain Bike Events / Planning and the Safety of Bikers

Mountain Bike Safety and Riding on the Trail

Endurance Sports, Driver Fatigue and Road Safety

Bridge-Cape-Pioneer-Trek-2014-Stage-4-#KammanassieKanon-1104lrweb

Stage 4 of the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek ended in George, taking the race from the dry Karoo to the forested coastal region. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

Buys, Beukes win Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek’s Queen Stage and move into lead

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Matthys Beukes (left) and Philip Buys reach the summit of the Swartberg Pass first to claim R125 000 pay cheque and the overall lead in the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek on Tuesday. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

South Africans Philip Buys and Matthys Beukes (SCOTT Factory Racing) showed impressive climbing ability when they won the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek’s Queen Stage and moved into the overall lead on Tuesday.

The South Africans were the first to the summit of the Swartberg Pass, the only mountaintop finish in international mountain bike stage racing. The signature stage, which covered 86km and climbed a total of 2781 metres, is also the richest, paying out R125 000 (US$12 500) to the first men and women’s teams to the finish line.

South African marathon champion, Robyn de Groot and Swedish marathon champion, Jennie Stenerhag (Biogen Toyota Cape Brewing Co.) were the first women’s team to the summit, extending their overall lead by almost seven minutes over stage runners-up, Briton Catherine Williamson and Belgian Alice Picard (Asrin Cycling).

The German-based Team Bulls riders, Tim Bohme and Simon Siegbahn, overall leaders for the first two days, faltered on the final ascent of the Swartberg Pass losing almost four minutes and dropping to second place on the General Classification.

The diminutive Spanish duo of Ismail Ventura and Ramon Segues (ESMTB.com) finished second on the stage and maintain their third place overall going into Wednesday’s Stage 3.

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The majestic Swartberg Pass gave the 2014 Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek another memorable racing chapter during Stage 2 on Tuesday. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

Beukes and Buys chose to race the Cape Pioneer Trek, traditionally considered better suited to dual-suspension bikes, on hardtails (no rear suspension) specifically with Tuesday’s stage in mind.

“We usually race our full-suspension SCOTT Sparks, but we decided that since we’re both quite skilled and were hungry for the win on the Swartberg Pass, SCOTT Scale hardtails would be our choice. Clearly the decision paid off,” beamed Beukes.

Their hardtails are 1000g lighter than their dual-suspension bikes, which may not seem like much, but is when the final climb has a relatively smooth gravel surface and climbs 1100 meters in 11km.

For De Groot and Stenerhag the stage win, by such a large margin, was a surprise.

“We decided to race this stage like any other stage and not become distracted by the final climb and the big prize money,” said Stenerhag.

“At around half way we noticed the Asrin team was right behind us, so we put in a bigger effort and moved clear of them. We weren’t sure what our lead was over them at the start of the last climb, but someone did shout to us a little later that we were four minutes ahead of them,” explained Stenerhag.

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A large lead group numbering 30 reached the base of the final Swartberg Pass climb at the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek on Tuesday. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

“We just focused on finding a good rhythm to hold our lead and were very happy to see that we increased it even,” smiled the Swede.

In the other team racing categories, South Africans James Tenant and David Garrett were the top Amateurs, claiming the GC lead in the process, while Germans Max Friedrich and Jana Mischance (Firebike Tomotion by Blacktusk) were the first Mixed team home, also moving into the overall lead in their division.

Heinz Zorweg (AUT) and Bartie Bucher (SUI) of Team Meerendal Wheeler 2 were the top Masters once again, extending their category lead significantly, while South Africans Johan Labuschagne and Gerrie Beukes (Klein Karoo Veterans) secured the Veteran men’s stage win and moved into second overall, behind compatriots Fanie Venter and Wayne McDuling (Pynfabriek).

In the Solo men’s division, Konny Looser (SUI) won the stage in his category and overall. He gained a lot of respect for his rapid ascent, but he didn’t gain any significant change to his bank balance, as the large cash prizes are only for the first teams to the summit. In the Solo women’s race Christine Janse van Rensburg (RSA), won another stage and extended her overall lead.

Wednesday’s Stage 3 is a 107km leg from Prince Albert to De Rust. With a total of 1543m of ascent, it’s expected to be a day of consolidation for many, although teams that haven’t lived up to their early expectations are likely to be in the hunt for a stage win.

For more information on the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek, visit www.capepioneer.co.za. For race updates, follow @BridgeCPT on twitter and Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek on Facebook.

Bridge-Cape-Pioneer-Trek-2014-Stage-2-#Swartbergshowdown-9375lrweb

Women's leaders Robyn de Groot (front) and Jennie Stenerhag climbed to a third successive stage victory on the Swartberg Pass at the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek on Tuesday. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek 2014
Stage 2
Leading results
Men:
1 Philip Buys (RSA) / Matthys Beukes (RSA) – SCOTT Factory Racing 3:57:19
2 Ismael Ventura (ESP) / Ramon Sagues (RSA) – ESMTB.com 3:58:11
3 James Reid (RSA) / Herman Persteiner (AUT) – Asrin Cycling 3:59:34
4 Michiel van Aelbroeck (NED) / Robby de Bock (NED) WMTB.Be – Feenstra 4:00:49
5 Johann Rabie (RSA) / Gawie Combrinck (RSA) EAI South Africa 4:00:52

Women:
1 Jennie Stenerhag (SWE) / Robyn de Groot (RSA) – Biogen Toyota Cape Brewing Co 4:29:35
2 Catherine Williamson (GBR) / Alice Pirard (BEL) Asrin Cycling 2 4:36:04
3 Theresa Ralph (RSA) / Esther Suss (SUI) – Meerendal Wheeler 1 4:47:27

Amateur:
1 James Tennent (RSA) / David Garrett (RSA) – Giant 2 4:31:39
2 Jaco Ferreira (RSA) / Alexander Lamberts (RSA) – Columbia Europcar Bridge 4:32:35
3 Jonathan Odendaal (RSA) / Bertus Odendaal (RSA) – Four Brothers 4:40:01

Veteran men:
1 Johan Labuschagne (RSA) / Gerrie Beukes (RSA) Klein Karoo Veterans 4:29:09
2 Fanie Venter (RSA) / Wayne McDuling (RSA) – Pynfabriek 4:36:48
3 Marne Dirks (RSA) / Pierre Griffioen (RSA) – Bridge Torq Zone Vets 4:52:54

Master men:
1 Heinz Zorweg (AUT) / Barti Bucher (SUI) – Meerendal Wheeler 2 4:13:30
2 Izak Visagie (RSA) / Lieb Loots (RSA) – Wilde 3 4:50:45
3 Waleed Baker (RSA) / Glen Haw (RSA) – Pitstop 5:01:25

Mixed:
1 Max Friedrich (GER) / Jana Zieschank (GER) – Firebike Tomotion by Blacktusk 4:28:39
2 Kobus Barnard (RSA) / Fienie Barnard (RSA) – Klein Karoo Mixed 4:40:29
3 Igna de Viliers (RSA) / Daleen Van der Leek (RSA) LGE Midas Bells Cycling 4:47:53

Solo men:
1 Konny Looser (SUI) 3:57:09
2 Travis Walker (RSA) 3:58:00
3 Alan Gordon (RSA) 4:06:10

Solo women:
1 Christine Janse van Rensburg (RSA) 4:58:34
2 Katja Cauwenbergh (BEL) 5:34:40
3 Nina Hind (RSA) 5:59:07

Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek 2014
General Classification after Stage 2
Leading results
Men:
1 Philip Buys (RSA) / Matthys Beukes (RSA) – SCOTT Factory Racing 8:18:21
2 Simon Stiebjahn (GER) / Tim Bohme (GER) – Team Bulls 8:21:48
3 Ismael Venture (ESP) / Ramon Sagues (RSA) – ESMTB.com 8:24:15
4 Waylon Woolcock (RSA) / Darren Lill (RSA) – Cannondale Blend 8:32:01
5 Michiel van Aelbroeck (NED) / Robby de Bock (NED) WMTB.Be – Feenstra 8:32:45

Women:
1 Jennie Stenerhag (SWE) / Robyn de Groot (RSA) – Biogen Toyota Cape Brewing Co 9:29:46
2 Catherine Williamson (GBR) / Alice Pirard (BEL) 9:43:26
3 Theresa Ralph (RSA) / Esther Suss (SUI) – Meerendal Wheeler 1 10:02:34

Amateur:
1 James Tennent (RSA) / David Garrett (RSA) – Giant 2 9:32:29
2 Jaco Ferreira (RSA) / Alexander Lamberts (RSA) – Columbia Europcar Bridge 9:37:19
3 Jonathan Odendaal (RSA) / Bertus Odendaal (RSA) – Four Brothers 9:40:10

Veteran men:
1 Fanie Venter (RSA) / Wayne McDuling (RSA) – Pynfabriek 9:32:38
2 Johan Labuschagne (RSA) / Gerrie Beukes (RSA) Klein Karoo Veterans 9:46:39
3 Marne Dirks (RSA) / Pierre Griffioen (RSA) – Bridge Torq Zone Vets 9:58:36

Master men:
1 Heinz Zorweg (AUT) / Barti Bucher (SUI) – Meerendal Wheeler 2 8:52:48
2 Izak Visagie (RSA) / Lieb Loots (RSA) – Wilde 3 9:56:34
3 Waleed Baker (RSA) / Glen Haw (RSA) – Pitstop 10:30:56

Mixed:
1 Max Friedrich (GER) / Jana Zieschank (GER) – Firebike Tomotion by Blacktusk 9:33:56
2 Kobus Barnard (RSA) / Fienie Barnard (RSA) – Klein Karoo Mixed 9:44:50
3 Igna de Viliers (RSA) / Daleen Van der Leek (RSA) LGE Midas Bells Cycling 10:06:09

Solo men:
1 Alan Gordon (RSA) 8:39:31
2 Travis Walker (RSA) 8:40:32
3 Ken van den Bulke (BEL) 8:45:04

Solo women:
1 Christine Janse van Rensburg (RSA) 10:18:42
2 Katja Cauwenbergh (BEL) 11:25:08
3 Nina Hind (RSA) 12:19:43

For full results visit www.capepioneer.co.za
Also view:

Mountain Bike Events / Planning and the Safety of Bikers

Mountain Bike Safety and Riding on the Trail

Endurance Sports, Driver Fatigue and Road Safety

 

First Car Rental Expands African Operations into Tanzania

Melissa_Storey and Moustafa_Khataw

Melissa Storey, Executive Head of Strategy, Development and Marketing at First Car Rental, with Moustafa H. Khataw, the business unit owner of First Car Rental Tanzania

First Car Rental is excited to announce that it has expanded its African operations by opening three new business units in Tanzania’s largest city, Dar es Salaam, as well as an operational presence in Arusha, the Mwanza Region and Zanzibar.
The new business unit forms part of First Car Rental’s car hire partnership with Moustafa H. Khataw, the CEO of Uniglobe Skylink Travel, previously a network partner to Avis and now the brand new but still the market leader: First Car Rental Tanzania.
Says Khataw, “We are witnessing an increase in flight frequency, new airlines and more hotels opening up in many parts of the country, which is a good indicator of economic growth, therefore it makes sense to partner with a well-managed and growing car rental enterprise such as First Car Rental.
"Their systems expertise and functionality and operational efficiencies are better suited to our fast-paced and growing industry.

"Their managing team are all decision-makers within their departments so there is no lag. It is fantastic and I look forward to a long beneficial relationship.”
First Car Rental Tanzania has a good selection of 4x4 vehicles, which are popular in the country, plus a handful of budget and passenger vans. They also offer full range of car hire services, including short and long-term car rental, direct transfers, and chauffeur drive packages.

First_Car_Rental_tanzania-office4

First Car Rental vehicles parked outside one of the new Tanzania branches, which is located inside the five-star Hyatt Regency Hotel in Dar es Salaam.

One of the new Tanzania business units is located within the five-star Hyatt Regency Hotel building in the heart of Dar es Salaam with superb views of the city’s harbour and Indian Ocean. There is also a branch presence at Dar es Salaam’s Julius Nyerere International Airport ensuring visitors to Tanzania have easy access to First Car Rental.

The latest expansion into Africa adds to First Car Rental’s existing business units, namely Mauritius, Malta and Turkey.

Bruce Barritt, Managing Director at First Car Rental, comments - “We are very excited to be adding a First Car Rental business unit in Tanzania, which is a growing East African country in the African Great Lakes region. This addition to our international family is a much needed expansion based on demand from South Africa to Tanzania and vice versa.”

Says Melissa Storey, Executive Head: Strategy, Development & Marketing at First Car Rental, “First Car Rental will provide First Car Rental Tanzania with various system tools within the next few months, allowing our customers a seamless process irrespective of international borders. It has been a pleasure setting up the unit and working alongside Mr Khataw and his team who are market leaders within the Tanzanian travel-industry. I believe that their move from a red: “we try harder” to a passionate purple: “first in car hire, first in service” will be a great one.”

To find out more about First Car Rental Tanzania and to hire a car today, visit the website at www.firstcarrental.co.tz, email info@firstcarrental.co.tz or phone +255 756 885 588.

Also view:

Car Rental and Road Safety

 

Additional Notes

First Car Rental provides affordable car hire in South Africa, and internationally reaching over 125 countries. First Car Rental has more than 6 000 vehicles in use in South Africa and has 49 car rental branches, including branches at all major South African airports, business and tourist destinations.
First Car Rental is recognised as one of the top car rental companies in the country having been selected, for the fourth consecutive year, as one of South Africa’s Top 500 Best Managed Companies.
For the past two years First Car Rental has also won the South African Service Awards in the Travel and Related Services sector defeating all major South African car hire competitors. First Car Rental was also awarded the ‘Most Consistent Performer over 3 Years.’
More info: http://www.firstcarrental.co.za

Stacked field promises thrilling Bride Cape Pioneer Trek battle

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The 2014 Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek international mountain bike stage race starts on Sunday, taking over 400 riders from 15 countries through some of the most dramatic landscapes in South Africa. Photo by Zoon Cronje/Nikon/Xtremedia

It’s the extreme conditions that make the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek the most unpredictable of mountain bike stage races and the top contenders for the 2014 edition, which starts in Oudtshoorn, South Africa on Sunday, have been scrutinising the long-term weather forecast with great interest.

Last year, torrential rain during the final two days made what should have been easier stages into character, skills and perseverance tests seldom seen in mountain bike stage racing. That the first five days take place in the Karoo, one of the driest regions in South Africa, made the relentless rainy stages even more telling, taking riders well beyond their limits physically and emotionally.

But the prospects of heavy rain are slim this year and it’s the course that’s likely to determine the final outcome in what is a very competitive international field, attracted by the event’s new UCI-grading status, daily TV coverage, and over R450 000 (US$45 000) in prize money.

The course is once again exceptionally varied, taking the riders through three different eco-regions, over a distance of 574km with 11958 metres of vertical ascent in seven days. The terrain ranges from smooth hardpack to loose and rocky to soft and loamy, with a higher percentage of singletrack than in previous editions.

Once again the iconic mountaintop finish at the summit of the Swartberg Pass on Stage 2 (Day 3) will offer a tactical challenge to the top racers. Do they put everything into trying to win the huge prize purse on that stage, or do they take a more measured approach and try to win the race overall? It’s possible to do both, but with the depth of the field this year, increasingly unlikely…

At 86km, Stage 2 is relatively short in distance, but it makes up for that with the total vertical ascent of 2781 metres, over 1000 of those climbing metres coming in the final 11km. It’s the richest stage in mountain bike stage racing with a total of R250 000 (about US$25 000) in cash, split equally between the first men’s team and the first women’s team to crest the summit.

Who are the main contenders? The list long, but worth examining:

The men’s race sees the all-German Team Bulls pairing of Tim Bohme and Simon Stiebjahn tackling the event for the first time. But they’re not new to stage racing, having finished third overall at the 2014 ABSA Cape Epic. They’ll be up against most of South Africa’s top marathon racers, including the Team RECM pair of Erik Kleinhans and Nico Bell, winners overall in 2013 and 2012 respectively.

Also in the hunt for men’s podium places are the Cannondale Blend duo of Waylon Woolcock and Darren Lill and the SCOTT Factory Racing team of Philip Buys and Matthys Beukes. Woolcock won the race with Kleinhans last year, while Buys and Beukes confirmed their good form after winning the tough Mankele 3 Towers three-day race last weekend.

Another former winner, Gawie Combrinck (2012), has teamed up with former top South African road racer, Johann Rabie in what could be a formidable pairing for this kind of race, while South African marathon champion, James Reid (Trek), has secured a last-minute partnership with young Austrian racer, Hermann Pernsteiner, bronze medallist at the 2014 Austrian marathon championships.

Another young pairing that promises much is the Kargo Pro Racing team of Rourke Croeser and Travis Walker. They won the PE-Plett four-day stage race last month and appear to have good form for the Cape Pioneer Trek, while the partnership of Adriaan Louw (Fairview) and Lourens Luus (RECM) could also deliver some podium-topping results.

Relatively unknown to South Africans, but also likely to enter the men’s podium mix is the Spanish duo of Ismael Sanchez and Ramon Portabella. Sanchez was fifth at the 2014 Spanish marathon championships, while Portabella was third at last month’s Quebrantaheusos, a UCI Marathon World Series race in Spain.

While the women’s race will be without defending champions, Ariane Kleinhans and Anika Langvad, it does boast more depth than ever before. Former marathon world champion, Esther Suss (SUI) and former multiple ABSA Cape Epic podium finisher, Theresa Ralph (RSA), have teamed up on Team Meerendal and would be considered by most the pre-race favourites, but only marginally.

They’ll be up against the Biogen Toyota Cape Brewing Co. pairing of South African marathon champion, Robyn de Groot and Swedish marathon champion, Jennie Stenerhag, winners of last month’s PE-Plett and the 2014 Sani2c stage races.

Asrin Cycling's Catherine Williamson (GBR) and Alice Pirard (BEL) will also be aiming for regular podium appearances, while former South African marathon champion, Cherise Stander (RECM) and compatriot, Candice Neethling (Velo Life) and Mauritian ace, Aurelie Halbachs and South African Yolandi du Toit also form combinations that add depth to the women’s title contender list.

There are more than 400 riders from 15 countries that will start the race at Buffelsdrift Game Lodge in Sunday’s opening prologue time trial stage.

Full race schedule:
Sunday 12 October: Prologue time trial, Buffelsdrift Game Lodge – 15.3km/371m
Monday 13 October: Stage 1, Oudtshoorn–Calitzdorp – 100km/1794m
Tuesday 14 October: Stage 2, Calitzdorp–Swartberg Summit – 86km/2781m
Wednesday 15 October: Stage 3, Prince Albert–De Rust – 107km/1543m
Thursday 16 October: Stage 4, De Rust–George – 109km/2690m
Friday 17 October: Stage 5, George–Herold – 71km/1755m
Saturday 18 October: Stage 6, Herold–Oudtshoorn – 86km/1024m

There will be daily TV highlights on SuperSport Channel 208 in South Africa. For more information on the Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek, visit www.capepioneer.co.za. For race updates, follow @BridgeCPT on twitter and Bridge Cape Pioneer Trek on Facebook.
Also view:

Mountain Bike Events / Planning and the Safety of Bikers

Mountain Bike Safety and Riding on the Trail

Endurance Sports, Driver Fatigue and Road Safety

 

Toyota C-HR Concept is an intoxicating combination of design innovation and driving pleasure

No Comments »Written on October 9th, 2014 by
Categories: Car Insurance, Vehicle

Toyota Concept

  • 4,350 mm long, 1,850 mm wide, 1,500 mm high and with a wheelbase of 2,640 mm, the C-HR Concept is conceived around a whole new platform
  • The concept employs a new, full hybrid powertrain that will deliver significantly improved fuel efficiency

Combining a bold new dynamic design language with an agile, engaging driving experience to create its own, unique offer within the highly-demanding European car market, a new concept vehicle, the Toyota C-HR Concept recently made its world debut at the 2014 Paris Motor Show.

It hints at the type of vehicle Toyota is aiming to bring to market within the near future. And, given Toyota's penchant for creating new market segments, the C-HR is a credible stepping stone for the company's next big innovation.

After all, it was a mere 20 years ago that Toyota carved a whole new market niche with its pioneering and ingenious RAV4. Fundamentally different to a traditional 4x4, the RAV4 featured a small, 2.0 litre engine mounted transversally within a monocoque bodyshell, and all-round independent suspension in a very compact body (just 3.69 m long), all this packaged in an aspirational and progressive design.

Then there was the Prius, the world's first mass-produced full hybrid vehicle. Launched in Japan in 1997 and in Europe in 2000, it featured a unique Toyota Hybrid System which established a major industry milestone in vehicle powertrain development and set new standards for quiet, ecologically-res­ponsible driving pleasure.

In 2012 Toyota did it again when it introduced the 86 to universal acclaim. Boasting the world's only front-mounted horizontally opposed engine and rear-wheel drive package, the compact, entirely driver-focused 2+2 sports car gives form to the pure, intrinsic joy of driving through precise, instantaneous response to even the smallest inputs.

Today the C-HR Concept recaptures the design and packaging ingenuity that spawned the first RAV4, emulates the success of the Prius with a new version of the sophisticated, full hybrid powertrain technology and, inspired by the 86, targets new levels of dynamism and agility.

This highly-innovative design study for a stylish, lightweight and dynamic C-segment hybrid crossover is designed to stand out in an increasingly homogenous market place. It is the next rendition of Akio Toyoda's promise, on taking over the presidency of Toyota, to build more emotional cars that make their owners fall in love with driving again.

The C-HR Concept offers the perfect combination of compact packaging and outstanding agility essential to those with active urban lifestyles.

It has been conceived around a new platform designed to satisfy customers' demands for state of the art handling and controllability. In conjunction, a new advanced full hybrid powertrain offers a uniquely engaging driving experience matched to 21st century traffic conditions, whilst delivering outstanding efficiency.

A new architecture styling theme

The Toyota C-HR Concept introduces an expressive new, diamond architecture styling theme to the segment. Below a compact, sensual cabin profile, the lower bodywork has been sculpted to represent the facetted surfaces of a highly-durable, precision-cut gemstone.

In plan form, the corners of the bodyshell have been cleanly shaved off. This both removes mass from the overall volume, and emphasises the powerful flair of the front and rear wheel arches, reinforcing the new crossover's broad, planted stance from every viewpoint.

The front of the C-HR Concept not only represents a further development of Toyota's Under Priority and Keen Look design identity, but also introduces new styling themes which hint at a future design direction for the brand.

Above a robust central bumper profile, the slim upper grille associated with Under Priority design has evolved into a floating 'wing' which flows seamlessly around the front corners of the vehicle. Within the wing, extrovert headlamp detailing incorporates a high-tech, 3D treatment of the distinctive Daytime Running Lights (DRL).

Adding emphasis to the vehicle corners to further reinforce the new crossover's solid stance, the large lower grille is flanked by strongly sculpted gills. These powerful frontal elements are underscored by an aero-inspired, floating front spoiler.

From the side, the highly-facetted lower body, 'XXL' wheel arches and aggressively angular rear shoulder are juxtaposed with an exceptionally sleek cabin profile.

The glasshouse is emphasized by the sweeping, uninterrupted extension of the side glazing into the rear screen. This creates a slim, floating, spoiler-tipped roofline the length of which is exaggerated by 'suspended' C-pillars which taper into needle points on either side of the rear screen.

The floating roof is detailed with patterned openings which create a uniquely animated play of light within the C-HR Concept's cabin space.

Seen from the rear, the dramatically tapering glasshouse emphasises the cross-over's wide shoulders and planted stance. Once again shaped in the manner of a facetted gemstone, the vehicle rear shares the front bodywork's corner detailing. Highly-distinctive, aero-inspired, floating rear lamp clusters further enhance the broad shoulders of the C-HR Concept's muscular lower bodywork.

A unique wheel design reinforces the vehicle's crossover credentials, the blade design of the spokes hinting at the sophistication and efficiency of the C-HR Concept's full hybrid powertrain.

Toyota Concept 2

A global project rooted in the European market

The C-HR Concept is another tangible application of Toyota's new Global Vision thinking, first advocated by President Akio Toyoda in 2011. Recognizing that Europe is the most demanding market for small and mid-sized vehicles, Toyota uses this region as benchmark for defining future global A-, B- and C-segment cars. Toyota Motor Europe (TME) has also become the company's skill centre for diesel engines, perceived quality and vehicle dynamics.

In the case of C-HR Concept, there was close cooperation between Toyota's vehicle planning centres in Japan and in Europe, in order to get a good understanding of the latest European customer demands and vehicle trends. As for the styling of the concept car, it is the result of a global cooperation between ED2 (European Design Development Centre) and the other design centres.

TME will continue to work hand in hand with TMC (Toyota Motor Corporation in Japan) to enter the C-crossover segment.

Imperial recognised for industry-leading employment practices

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From Left to right: Samantha Crous from Top Employers, Dr Johan de Beer – Imperial Holdings, Evelyn de Wee – Imperial Automotive Retail, Berenice Francis – Imperial Holdings, Krishnie Pillay – Imperial Holdings, Otto Koornhof – Associated motor Holdings

Leading mobility and transport company Imperial has been recognised as a leader in the Automotive, Transport and Logistics industry by the global Top Employers Institute for its exceptional human resources practices and procedures.

The Netherlands based Top Employers Institute globally certifies excellence in the conditions that employers create for the development of their people. Annually, the institute conducts rigorous international research into the HR environment of participating companies, probing areas such as talent strategies, leadership development, career planning and succession management among others. The certification programme is independently audited, adding to the rigour of the process.

Samantha Crous, Regional Director South Africa and Benelux for the Top Employers Institute said: “Optimal employee conditions ensure that people can develop themselves personally and professionally. Our comprehensive research concluded that Imperial provides an outstanding employment environment and offers a wide range of creative initiatives, from secondary benefits and working conditions to performance-management programmes that are well thought out and truly aligned with the culture of their company.”

Commenting on the accolade Imperial CEO, Mark Lamberti said: “Given the current competitive environment the ability to attract and retain the best talent is a strategic imperative for Imperial. I would like to thank our HR teams across the group for their continued passion and efforts in ensuring that Imperial is not only a leader within its industry, but a recognised leader within the South African market.”

About Imperial   

Imperial Holdings is a JSE listed South African-based international group of companies active predominantly in three major areas of mobility: consumer and industrial logistics; vehicle import, distribution, dealerships, retail, rental and aftermarket parts; and vehicle-related financial services.

Imperial employs over 51 000 people who generate revenues of over R100 billion in Africa, Europe, South America, Australia and the United States through five major divisions which operate under separate management structures to enable decentralised entrepreneurial creativity within the group’s clearly-defined strategic, capital, budgetary and governance principles.

Imperial strives for focused value creation and leadership in its chosen markets by allocating capital and resources to those organic and acquisitive growth opportunities that will enhance and be enhanced by the group’s existing assets and capabilities. www.imperial.co.za

The Top Employers Institute assesses participants on the following criteria:

 

  • Talent Strategy
    • Workforce Planning
    • On-boarding
    • Learning & Development
    • Performance Management
    • Leadership Development
    • Career & Succession Management
    • Compensation & Benefits
    • Culture

 

For more information about the Top Employers Institute go to www.top-employers.com.

 

Police emphasizes the threat to business and economic sustainability by cable theft

No Comments »Written on October 8th, 2014 by
Categories: Business

rail cable theft

The Deputy Minister of Police at a recent Business Breakfast Commercial Crime Stats business briefing emphasized need to bring cable thieves to justice! We would like to quote:

"Perhaps the greatest threat posed on the sustainability of the country’s infrastructure and related economy, is cable theft.

More so, theft of cables impacts negatively on both private and public business sectors in situations where there is a consequential loss of availability of working telephone lines, electricity and trains.

The loss of these services impacts negatively on productivity, planning and profit margins to create more jobs. But, there has been a strong focus by our Detective Services on syndicates profiling, and our Visible Policing Division is operating and inspecting in terms of the Second-Hand Goods Act.

In addition to these measures against cable theft, there is also a Non-Ferrous Metals Crime Combating Committee (NFMCCC), which, comprised of various role-players such as SAPS, Telkom, Eskom, Transnet, etc. The NFMCCC has prioritized the scrap metal market, where SAPS and other role-players conduct regular proactive operations involving specific identified scrap merchants.

Ladies and Gentlemen, as you can see, SAPS is at work every day against crime. But equally, we will continue to encourage for more police training on commercial crime, as like any other science, police training requires ongoing review and improvement. And, this requires the Business Sector’s 100% support in both financial and human resource.

Let us all present here, send a strong collective warning to all criminals and would-be criminals that collectively we would not tire to support our police officers to enforce the law to its maximum.

We are all here to ensure that our communities, businesses, schools, homes, recreational areas, are safe and secure. So, let us commit.

I thank you all!

Deputy Minister of Police"

Also view:

Crime as a Threat to Road Safety

Hopetown copper success  jpg

Police seek assistance finding perpetrators of robbery at Shoprite U-Save in Tembisa

No Comments »Written on October 7th, 2014 by
Categories: Business, Legal

10626494_961749170518692_8692325181134710500_nGauteng police are appealing to members of the public to assist with information regarding the whereabouts of the suspects on the pictures.

The suspects are sought in connection with an alleged business robbery at Shoprite U-Save at Emfihlweni Section Tembisa in June 2014.

The suspects fled the scene with a white Toyota Quantum. Anyone who might have seen or have knowledge and the whereabouts of the suspects, can forwarded the information to Detective Sergeant Mabale on (011) 926 2970 / 072 136 4040 or contact Crime Stop Line on 08600 10111 or SMS to 32211.

The suspect is considered to be dangerous and community members are advised to be cautious.

Also view:

Crime as a Threat to Road Safety

Does your alarm system meet the requirements of business insurance?

How can I protect my business from burglary?
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Do not be blinded by the price tag when buying vehicles for your fleet

Dr Molapo

Dr Molapo, Head of Fleet Management at Standard Bank

The most common mistake that businesses make when buying vehicles for their fleet is to give too much weight to the purchase price. Vehicles with the lowest price tag on the showroom floor can easily turn out to be the most expensive choice for fleet owners.

Dr David Molapo, Head of Fleet Management at Standard Bank, advises prospective fleet buyers to calculate the total cost of ownership over the entire useful lifespan of each of the vehicles that they consider buying.

Only then will their true value become clear, allowing for proper comparisons between different brands, models and the entire class of vehicles.

For example, fleet buyers may go for half-ton bakkies instead of one-tonners, simply because smaller vehicles carry a lower price tag. However, if a half-tonner has been bought to perform the job of a one-tonner, maintenance bills will push the life-time costs of a half-tonner way beyond that of a bigger bakkie,” says Dr Molapo. It ends up being too expensive regardless of its purchase price.

“Once the use and application of the vehicle has been considered and the correct class of vehicle chosen, the range of brands and models within that class can still be quite bewildering. Again, careful calculation of the total cost of ownership of each vehicle on your short list can help you to make the best choice.”

Dr Molapo says total cost of ownership is made up of instalment payments (or purchase price if the vehicle is bought outright in cash), fuel consumption, maintenance costs, tyres, insurance, tracking and licencing.

He illustrates that the purchase price of a vehicle can well be less than half of its total cost of ownership.

For example, a small 1.6 sedan with a showroom price tag of R220 000 that has travelled for 120 000 kilometres over 48 months will accumulate a total cost of ownership of R465 000, broken down as follows:

  • Repayments               R262 022 (purchase price financed at 9.25%)
  • Fuel                             R105 907
  • Maintenance               R39 237
  • Insurance                    R38 400
  • Tracking                      R12 000
  • Tyres                           R6 689
  • Licencing                     R1 344

Certain components of the total cost of ownership are clear, such as the repayment, tracking and licensing. However, calculating the amount of fuel and maintenance that a vehicle will require over its life span is more complex than it seems.

The first step should be looking at the official figures from the manufacturer, says Dr Molapo. But keep in mind that they typically reflect the use of the vehicle under ideal circumstances. Fuel consumption, maintenance and tyres will certainly be higher than manufacturers' professed figures if a vehicle does a lot of dirt-road travelling or stop-start city driving.

Dr Molapo recommends that a buyer supplements the manufacturers' claims with information gathered from other fleet owners, industry bodies, the Automobile Association, vehicle reviews in the motoring media and advice from their vehicle financier.

Apart from the cold cost calculation, the human factor must also be considered. For example, the most careful predictions of the total cost of ownership of a vehicle will often be inaccurate if the vehicle is used by a bad driver. While driver training may seem like an unnecessary extra expense, it can reduce the total cost of owning a vehicle significantly.

Therefore, it is important to consider the specific use of the vehicles, and fleet owners should think beyond the potentially unrealistic savings of a low purchase price, and consider the total cost of ownership before committing to a purchase,” concludes Dr Molapo.

Also view:

Vehicle Finance, Car Insurance and Road Safety

Buying and Selling a Vehicle – Informed decisions and the Vehicle Retailer

Fleet Management, Logistics and Road Safety